Corporate Social Responsibility

Are CSR posts effective on social media?

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is also an important part of a company’s social media presence, so we wanted to take a deeper look into the relationship between CSR and positive sentiment.

Zavy

July 24, 2019

In previous blog posts we’ve talked about the effectiveness of Cultural Moments and Competitions content and how companies leverage this activity. But Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is also an important part of a company’s social media presence, so we wanted to take a deeper look into the relationship between CSR and positive sentiment.

What is CSR and why is it important?

CSR has become a key part of the corporate world. Consumers want to see companies be aware of and responsible for their impact on the community around them. We have previously discussed that engagement drives return, particularly positive engagement – shares and comments – so it’s only natural that companies have caught on to the fact that CSR posts can equate to engagement and sentiment.

Let’s take Foodstuffs as an example.

At the end of 2018, Foodstuffs supermarkets New World, PAK’nSAVE and Four Square announced that they will stop supplying single-use plastic bags in all stores across the country to try and reduce the amount of plastic in the environment. These supermarkets have been encouraging their customers to switch to reusable options, such as tote bags, and have recently been using #PlasticFreeJuly as part of their ongoing social media campaign. New World’s Bags Not post generated almost 70% of positive sentiment with many Kiwis praising the supermarket for taking steps towards an environmentally friendly and sustainable company practice.

New World has also combined a CSR post with a competition which yielded positive results. To promote their latest initiative, BYO containers to use at the butchery, seafood, bakery and deli counters, they gave their audience a chance to win one of three sets of Sistema Brilliance leak-proof containers, simply by commenting on the post what they will be shopping for with the BYO containers. This initiative was part of the company-wide reduction in plastic use. Over 3.7k comments were made on the post, many of them congratulating New World again for taking another step towards reducing the use of plastic in their stores. The post had the highest engagement against New World’s competition with a shares-to-like ratio of 19%.

ASB’s This Is Us campaign is another example of successful CSR posting on social media. The campaign is a collaboration between ASB and Kiwi poet, playwright and short story author, Courtney Sina Meredith. The one-minute video centres around a poem written and performed by Meredith, celebrating and encouraging diversity. The video features ASB staff and customers at different events such as Diwali, Auckland Lantern Festival and Polyfest, all events which ASB sponsor. The video saw a shares-to-like ratio of 11%. The following posts in this campaign featured ASB employees from various areas of the company with a short story about their lives, their culture and becoming part of ASB using #ThisIsUs.

CSR and positive sentiment

CSR posts have the ability to decrease and/or convert neutral sentiment into positive sentiment. Positive sentiment via comments and shares is one of the most important metrics relating to engagement. To put it simply: 89% of uplift is driven by positive comments and shares (for more on this, check out our whitepaper).

If a company is seen to be involving themselves in the community or supporting charities, for example, consumers are more likely to respond positively to the company. This translates into engagement on social media – all of which drives performance.

So, how can CSR be optimised?

CSR posts make up 27% of overall social media content, on average. These posts can be leveraged further if they are combined with another one of the five common categories, like the New World post which combines CSR and Competition.

Key points

- CSR posts make up 27% of social media content, on average.

- They have the ability to shift ‘neutral’ sentiment into ‘positive’ sentiment.

- CSR posts yield long-term quality engagement.

- Combining CSR with another common content category is a successful tactic.